Twitter & More Twitter: Increasing Traffic & Managing Followers

Hola Todos!

While listening to my weekly dose of the Social Media Marketing Podcast by Michael Stelzner, I heard an excellent nugget that I had to pass along. Michael was interviewing Kim Garst on how to use Twitter to increase traffic to your blog.

At the 37:35 mark, I heard the best nugget of the podcast when Kim brought up a web based Twitter utility called ManagerFlitter.  Not only does it help with removing spammers that are following you on Twitter, it also has a much more robust search function where it is easier to find or track real-time conversations around different keywords – cool!

Something to check out today…

Best regards

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Social Media Promo vs. Super Bowl Promo: Who Wins?

Hola Todos!

At first glance, the results from this study is exactly what I’ve been preaching in my social media classes:  new media (e.g., the interactive, two-way social kind) is much better than traditional media (e.g., the one way, untrackable, I don’t know what I’m getting for my money kind).

As I have mentioned a few times before, I have an ROI mentality and I do not recommend for anyone to spend their marketing dollars when they do not know what they are getting for those expenditures.  Digital media is not perfect but it is a lot better than wasting half of my advertising dollars.

In a study of 500 small businesses by office supply giant Staples, 41 percent of the participants indicated they would take two million fans, almost double the number that would prefer a celebrity endorsement (22%) or a one-time Super Bowl ad (18%).

At second glance, the headline is much better than the overall results of the study.  Not only is 500 a relatively small sample size, it only includes small businesses (which goes undefined).  In addition, how much each of the survey participants spend on advertising is also unclear.  In summary, it makes a nice blog post but the results are not generalizable to larger firms nor other small businesses.

Something to think about today…

Best

Dr. Dan-o

More Than Just Clicks: Where is the Social ROI?

Hola Todos!

A friend forwarded me this link yesterday from TechCrunch highlighting comments from the TechCrunch Disrupt NY conference. At the event, senior advertising managers from Google, Facebook, and Twitter discussed/argued the value of digital advertising. Surprisingly, the panel spent more time discussing the value of a click than anything else.  Not surprisingly, the three firms stated that their brand advertisers are most concerned with the reach, frequency and results of their ad campaigns.

As my students will surely attest, I have an ROI mentality and discussing how much a “click” is worth is mostly uninteresting.  Of the three panelist, only Facebook mentioned  they have “been doing quite a bit of research in an attempt to tie online ads to offline purchases.”  In the article, Facebook said they are working with “Nielsen and DataLogix” which means they are really working with our friends at Catalina Marketing, which is the only firm that can link online behavior to offline purchases.

Something to read today…

Best

Dr. Dan-o

 

 

Happy Birthday Twitter!

Hola Todos!

Yesterday was Twitter’s 7th birthday.  I’m sorry I’m late by a day…it was a busy Thursday and it’s not like Twitter said happy birthday to me or anything.  With birthdays comes much reminiscing and there were a number of excellent Twitter stories this week.  Jack Dorsey was on 60 Minutes last weekend.  In addition, NPR and CNN (here and here) did nice retrospectives including some of the top tweets of all time.

Enjoy!

best

Dr. Dan-o

 

 

Twitter Mentioned in Half of the Super Bowl Ads

Hola Todos!

Being one of the biggest marketing/advertising events of the year, it is not surprising that the stories are still pouring out from Sunday’s big game.  One of the more interesting one’s details how Twitter was mentioned in nearly half of the Super Bowl ads while Facebook was mentioned in just four (down from eight last year).  For those keeping score at home, Instagram and YouTube were each mentioned once while Google+ when unmentioned.

Towards the end of his post, Matt McGee concluded:

“When it comes to second-screen advertising, it’s Twitter’s world now and there’s no close second place.”

I’m not sure I would agree here.  Twitter is all about immediacy and if the goal of the advertiser was to engage their audience now vs. later, then Twitter is the better platform.  I think much more data crunching is needed before we can claim that Twitter owns the second-screen.

What Matt and I will agree on is that Twitter is the better platform to capitalize on something quick – like the Blackout Bowl:

“They even took to Twitter for some quick and clever “blackout bowl” newjacking when the power went out in the Superdome during the third quarter. And, as Twitter’s advertising staff revealed, it only took four minutes for Twitter advertisers to start bidding on “power outage” as a search term.”

Something to think about today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Apple Maps, Smartphone Survey, Campbell Soup Going Digital and Other Interesting Stuff

Hola Todos!

I have been quite busy over the last week so today’s post is more of a round-up of interesting articles.

I was reading Philip Elmer-DeWitt’s Apple 2.0 blog the other day and I feel he offered the best explanation to why Apple pulled the plug on Google maps.  I think more interesting is Apple’s C-suite of old is more to blame than Apple’s C-Suite of new.  Why didn’t this happen with iPhone 3Gs or iPhone 4G?

On another topic, we often talk about when markets switch from pure growth and shift to a mature marketplace that is zero-sum.  This link, also from Apple 2.0, adds to the growing evidence that the smartphone marketplace is getting closer to becoming mature.

Staying on the Apple theme, here’s a solid argument to why iPhone 5 opening weekend wasn’t as soft as everyone thought.

The history of computing in fewer than ten slides?  That’s a link checking out.

Campbell Soup’s CEO Denise Morrison has made digital media a top priority and Adam Kmiec, global head of digital marketing & social media at Campbell Soup Co., will get it done.  Campbell Soup, “will become the most digitally fit [consumer packaged-goods] organization in the world,” says Mr. Kmiec.

I’m consistently following Yahoo and everyone is curious to see what Yahoo will become once its irons out its strategy.  Now I wonder what acquisitions CEO Marissa Mayer will do with the Alibaba cash.

Finally, they may be the CEO but they are not very social; a great article from Harvard Business Review on why CEO’s don’t tweet.

 

Lot’s to think about today…

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

Twitter’s Business Model?

Hola Todos!

Beyond Yahoo and the “What is Yahoo?” question, the other “billion” dollar question frequently discussed in the business press is “What is Twitter’s business model?” To be honest, a simple answer to that question does not exist.

A new flurry of articles sprang up after Twitter announced in late June that Twitter will soon have “stricter guidelines” around how much latitude independent developers will have to build applications on top of Twitter (e.g., its API). At the same time, LinkedIn announced it no longer had permission to include Twitter streams inside of the social network (click here for more detail from Reuters).

In sum, it appears Twitter is on the move to towards an “advertising” dominant model as they clamp-down on how and where Twitter’s content – the stream of Tweets – is viewed by users (e.g., controlling the where the eyeballs see Tweets).  Twitter’s 140 million monthly active users collectively publish 400 million Tweets daily and CEO Dick Costolo believes Twitter will have a $1 billon dollar ad business by 2014.

Recently, I listened to John Gruber’s “The Talk Show” podcast (from approximately the 28:00 to the 1:03:00 min mark – click here) with guest Dan Frommer and they dumped a healthy hump of skepticism on this strategy (click here for Dan Frommer’s detailed commentary on his blog SplatF).

While Twitter is just 6 years young, the pressure is on for Twitter to develop a sustainable business model.  For the past 18 to 24 months, the leaders at Twitter still have not convinced any of their constituents (e.g., the business press, advertisers, geek professors like myself, etc) that they have a business model that is both scalable and sustainable.  I expect to see more announcements/refinements from Twitter by year’s end.

Something to think about today…

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University