Failing to Start: You don’t need a Map – You need a Compass

Hola Todos!

I’ve got another excellent nugget for you – again from listening to podcasts via my Stitcher App.

I was listening to Michael Stelzner, founder/CEO of The Social Media Examiner and he was interviewing Seth Godin.  In their conversation on failing to start, why people accept mediocrity and how to change that, Seth something very nuggetworthy pertaining mentoring:

 

Anyone who has drawn you a map has done you no favors because maps are not anything if you’re an artist.  All you need is a compass.  I’m not telling you I’ve got it all figured out.  I’m helping you with some of the tools for you to figure it out.”

 

Something to think about today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Power of Storytelling: Do People Believe Who They Are Today is Essentially Who They Will Be Tomorrow?

Hola Todos!

One of my research passions is storytelling and I’ve been working on an axiom that goes something like this: “Just as our DNA creates the blueprint to our physical or biological self, stories or narratives we select as our own acts as the blueprint to our psychological self.”

An excellent post on NPR.org details a study by Harvard University social psychologist Daniel Gilbert (anything by Professor Gilbert is worth reading) that investigates the premise “Do people believe who they are today is essentially who they will be tomorrow?”

We understand that as we age, we change physically but the same time, we expect our personality to stay consistent.  As Professor Gilbert states, “I have this deep sense that although I will physically age – I’ll have even less hair than I do and probably a few more pounds – that by and large the core of me, my identity, my values, my personality, my deepest preferences, are not going to change from here on out.”

In the study, Professor Gilbert and his research team collected 19,000 surveys from people in the 30’s and their 40’s.  Some people were asked to look back on how they changed over the past 10 years. Others were asked to predict how they thought they would change in the next decade.

When the research team examined the data, “We’re able to determine whether, for example, 40-year-olds looking backwards remember changing more than 30-year-olds looking forwards predict that they will change.” They found that people underestimated how much they will change in the future. People just didn’t recognize how much their seemingly essential selves would shift and grow.

Just think about it; the stories you told yourself in high school probably changed by the time you got out of college.  What you thought you wanted to be when started college, changed by the time you were five years out of college.  When you’re in your 40’s and look back on your career choices and aspirations of your 20’s, those stories are different too.

So understand that in the future, the internal dialog that you have with yourself will change over time.  It’s not a bad thing, its just natural, normal human behavior.

Something to think about today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIIFM: What’s in it for me?

Hola Todos!

For those of you who have had the torture of being in one of my classes, no doubt you have heard me say on more than one occasion, that good marketers “Tell people what’s in it for them – because if there is nothing in it for them, they will not be interested in anything you’re selling.”

I was reading my Linkedin messages this morning and I saw an interesting post from Peter Guber – someone I follow within Linkedin because he wrote a rather interesting book on storytelling titled “Tell to Win: Connect, Persuade, and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story.”

I though the post was a nice fit with all my chatter this week on new year’s resolutions.  Titled “10 New Year’s Resolutions You Must Make For Your Greatest Business Success” the post features two items that caught my eye:

#2 – In gathering collaborators and support, focus on “what’s in it for them” – this will garner their attention and intention to respond to your call to action.

#9 – Embrace failure – if you’re not failing on occasion, you’re not taking enough chances testing the real quality of your talents and will unlikely achieve your greatest success.

Check out the full article when you get a chance.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Goals for the New Year: 2013 Edition

Hola Todos!

As mentioned in many posts, I’m a big fan of goal setting.  I like to use the start of a new year as a means to re-boot and look ahead to what I would like to accomplish this year.   Before I get to the list, I’ll first review a previous post focusing research based tips for making and keeping your new goals, such as: (1) make short, attainable goals; (2) develop a specific action plan; (3) establish confidence in your plan; and (4) publicly declaring your resolutions to hold yourself accountable.

In the spirit of item #4 above, I am publically declaring the following four goals for the coming year.  (Note: I am dropping from 5 professional goals to 4 as one of the biggest lessons learned from last year was I packed my schedule in too tight, did not leave wiggle room for the unexpected, and had to drop items in my to-do list to put out fires.)

#1 – Tenure – There is not a bigger goal on this list than the tenure goal.  As an untenured professor at Seton Hall University, my packet is due for review on October 1st, 2013.  I have much work to do – specifically I’m short 1 academic article. I have a number of irons in the fire and each day for the next 4 months, the first thought on my brain when I get up will be research and writing.  And yes, that means DigNuggetville will take a back seat here and there as needed.

#2 – The Social Media Committee for the 2014 NY/NJ Super Bowl –The 2014 Super Bowl will be played in Giants/Jets MetLife Stadium – the first cold weather Super Bowl in decades.  I’m happy to say I’ll be part of this event as I am a member of the Social Media Team for the Super Bowl Host Committee.  We had a number of meetings last fall and we have a full set of meetings set for this spring.   I’ll have more to say about the Social Media Team as we progress throughout the year.

#3 – Take a Deep Dive into YouTube – Last year’s deep dive was into Twitter and this year’s deep dive will be YouTube.  I have not hosted/posted any Dr. Dan-o videos on DigNuggetville but this year, I want to make YouTube my social media goal for the year.  Stay tuned for what I can cook up in the YouTube department.

#4 – Run Forbidden Drive by June 20th – Each year I set an exercise goal because if I do not, I’ll just sit on my fat ass and gain weight.  Last year, I trained (not too well – many injuries and set backs) but I did finish the Broad Street Run.  Even if I was in shape for last year’s Broad Street, there were too much extraneous downsides to running with 40,000 people.  While training last year, I recalled my younger day marathon training runs in Philly through Fairmount Park – particularly up and down Forbidden Drive.  To the best of my knowledge, I have not run the 10 plus mile Forbidden Drive trail since fall 1997 or spring 1998.  A recent trip to the Chestnut Hill area of Philly re-kindled those thoughts and I’m making this the 2013 exercise goal for the year.

That’s all for now.  As I did last year, I will keep posting updates on a semi-regular basis.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

 

MAKE Your New Years Resolution Stick! – Update: 2012 Round Up

Hola Todos!

A little more than a year ago, I created 5 professional goals to which I shared on the blog and 5 personal goals to which I did not, to accomplish for the 2012 year.  To summarize, goal setting is the easy part.  Goal maintenance and goal achievement is the hard part.  Goals are important because they serve as those big rocks to set your sights on.  Actually achieving each an every goal may or may not be as important as actually having a goal, attempting to achieve that goal, perhaps failing and learning something just as important along the way.  One of my favorite expressions is “The journey is the reward”  – a Chinese proverb but also recently used in the Steve Jobs biography.

As for the Big 5 Goals – Here’s a Review

#1 – Focus & Simplify – I said to myself many times last year this was and will continue be the hardest of them all.  As the year progressed, many, many, MANY things get dropped in your lap – and almost all of these are unexpected things that are usually a fire you need to put out.  Needless to say, I struggled with this goal.

The lessoned learned was to leave “buffer time” to deal with the unexpected.  I DID NOT nor am I used to leaving “buffer time.”  In other words, I’d plan my day/week with a jam-packed list of activities with little to no margin for error for the unexpected.  That will change in 2013.  Perhaps the goal should have been titled “Focus & Simplify & Hedge”

#2 – I need 2 academic research articles published this year – As an untenured Seton Hall professor, I need a minimum of three academic articles to be reviewed for tenure. Article #2 was wrapped up in 2012 and article 3 is very very close – end of January at the latest for submission.  In addition, I have other research projects which are far along and this will be task #1 for 2013.

#3 – Run the Broad Street Run – I did run the 10 Mile Broad Street Run in May.  It wasn’t pretty but I finished.  More importantly, I’ve stayed in shape playing in a men’s soccer pick up league, which is a lot of fun. I’m probably going to pick a different exercise goal for 2013

#4 – Take a Deep Dive into Twitter – I’m glad I spent the time and effort on Twitter last year.  I am substantially more comfortable with Twitter in January 2013 than January 2012. I have found a comfortable medium, I did have some meaningful connections, and I do not feel the need to be on it 24/7 as its not email.

#5 – Double my DigNuggetville Traffic – Thanks to healthy doses of Google-Juice, the DigNuggetville traffic was up substantially compared to 2011. Month-to-month comparisons, both in year and year-to-year, all showed a minimum of 2X traffic increases.  Now before I pat myself on the back, the numbers for the four months in 2011 and the first six months of 2012 were relatively low.  The question is – will 2013 be 2X 2012?

Thank you all for listening.  In Tuesday’s post, I will outline my goals for 2013.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

Should Your Career Path be More Opportunistic or Planned?

Hola Todos!

As you all know, I search high and low for nuggets and I found a good one yesterday.  I enjoy listening to the Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders podcast on the Stitcher app. “Stanford University’s Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Seminar is a weekly speaker series that brings innovation leaders from business, finance, technology, education, and philanthropy, to share their insights with aspiring entrepreneurs from all over the world,” as described on the Stanford web site.

While listening Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s talk titled “Spotlight on Scalability” and presented on April 22, 2009 (older presentations are available on Stitcher but not on the web site), Ms. Sandberg was asked the following question:

“Earlier in your career path, were you more opportunistic in your career choices or were they planned?”

In her response, Ms. Sandberg responded quickly and conclusively, stating:

“I think in careers, you need two things; (you need) a long-term dream and a short-term plan. And a short-term plan, I don’t know if its a year or two years but its between 12 and 24 months – it’s not longer.  The stuff in between is a big waste of time at best, and completely anxiety producing and counterproductive at worst.”

Something to think about today…

Best

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

MAKE Your New Years Resolution Stick! – Update: October Edition

Hola Todos!

It’s been a while since I’ve posted an update on my new years resolutions.  The lack of new updates – I’d say – is an indication to how hard it’s to stay on top of your goals and to keep important goals in the forefront.  There’s less than a quarter of the year left so here’s an update on my Big 5:

#1 – Focus & Simplify – of all the goals, this one has been the hardest.  As the year progressed, many, many, MANY things get thrown your way to push you off course.  Most of them are tasks you did not plan for in advance and most of them are tasks you did not want to be involved with in the first place.

That said, life happens and you can’t avoid unexpected stuff.  The last 3 to 4 months has had a lot of unexpected stuff.  In my eyes, the most limited resource we have is time and I always go back, regardless of how deep my to–do list is, and set those Big Rocks First.  If the Big Rocks to not get done, it really doesn’t matter what else gets accomplished.

#2 – I need 2 academic research articles published this year – As an untenured Seton Hall professor, I need a minimum of three academic articles to be reviewed for tenure.   I’m happy to say that I wrapped up article #2 as I received an acceptance letter from a journal in mid-September.  That leaves me one short with 12 months to go – which is not a whole lot of time in the academic world.  I do have one other article in the review process and I have a second article that will be sent into the review process before the end of this semester.  As I was telling a colleague yesterday, I have two horses to in the race and I need one of them to break the tape but October 1st 2013.

#3 – Run the Broad Street Run – I did run the 10 Mile Broad Street Run in May.  It wasn’t pretty but I finished.  More importantly, I’ve stayed in shape playing in a men’s soccer pick up league, which is a lot of fun.  I think the challenge is what to do over the winter.  In preparing for Broad Street, I broke my treadmill in March. I have a few more weeks for soccer so I’m going to have to address this issue sometime in the near future.  It’s not a Big Rock at the moment.

#4 – Take a Deep Dive into Twitter – I am happy to say that there has been some progress on this front.  I have found a comfortable medium with Twitter and I do not feel the need to be on it 24/7 as its not email.  However, I do have some meaningful connections that happened because of Twitter so I’d say is been a good experience.  I have been doing more with Twitter lists to separate my stream as too many people just blurt and broadcast and I don’t need to see all of those tweets.  With Twitter lists, I do pay attention to a smaller set of people, which is much easier to manage.

#5 – Double my DigNuggetville Traffic – This is no question that my traffic is up compared to this time last year.  The upside of posting for a year is that older posts have picked up some Google-Juice and are consistently receiving daily hits.  I’m not sure I’m exactly double as I have to take a closer look but traffic is up and I’m happy.  Research articles are more important but one day, I will have more time to pump into traffic building strategies.

Thank you all for listening.  Please drop me a line if you have any thoughts and/or questions.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

A tribute to Stephen Covey

Hola Todos!

Stephen Covey, one of the world’s foremost leadership authorities, organizational experts and thought leaders, passed away yesterday.  However, the ideas from the sage including the landmark “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” as well as “First Things First,” “Principle-Centered Leadership,” and “The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness” will live on.  In my eyes, “The 7 Habits” is as close to management canon as “How to Win Friends and Influence People.” For information on the life of Mr. Covey click here and for an excellent tribute by Tom Peters in The Washington Post, click here.

It was Mr. Covey’s “First Things First” is what I will remember him most by as his “Big Rocks First” parable (click here) not only got me though my Ph.D. program, but also is a critical principle of my day-to-day time management.

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

 

 

 

MAKE Your New Years Resolution Stick! – Update: April Edition

Hola Todos!

With three months in the books and nine to go, I have to remind myself that this “goal setting stuff” is not a sprint – it’s a marathon.  If February was “challenging,” I’m not sure what to call March – “frustrating”?

March and April are two of my busiest months as an academic.  November is probably next in line.  The frustrating thing is I put in a lot of hours on these 5 goals as well as others and I have little to show for it.  Ouch….

While I certainly did not sit on my butt and do nothing, I also did not knock out or make significant progress on any of the Big 5 listed below.  Again, this is a marathon and not a sprint and I needed to spend more time focusing on the BIG ROCKS FIRST (click here for full blog post).

That said, here’s the update on my big five goals.

#1 – Focus & Simplify – Of all the 5 goals, I really lost track of this one in March.  I did not focus as well as I should and very few things were simplified.  I did not plan ahead as well as I did January or February.  I have to do a better job with my BIG ROCK lists on a weekly basis.

#2 – I need 2 academic research articles published this year – While I made substantial progress on my 2nd academic article, it is not ready for review.  I truly think it needs another 4 to 5 weeks and a realistic goal at the present time is to have it done by finals (e.g., the first week in May).

#3 – Run the Broad Street Run – Ouch – Ouch – Ouch – literally and figuratively.  All the exercise and then the new soccer games caused my knee to swell up.  I am very very lucky that the MRI and X-Ray showed no major damage; just swelling due to overuse given its current strength.  Temple Sports Medicine prescribed rest (I took two weeks off from running) and knee/leg strengthen exercises.  I’ve run 5 times since including a 55-minute Long Slow Distance (AKA LSD) run yesterday.  I am not where I thought I would be in April, I still believe I’ll be able to do the 10 Mile Broad Street Run.

#4 – Take a Deep Dive into Twitter – I’m not sure if I got bored with Twitter or I just didn’t have the time to play with it but I did not have any major epiphany with the service in March. I logged in now and then – I Tweeted – I added a few followers – ho hum – I did what I was supposed to do.  The only problem is now – I have a little voice in the back of my head telling me I should have picked YouTube.  Perhaps this summer….

#5 – Double my DigNuggetville Traffic – February was the best month in the history of DigNuggetville blog. March did not top it.  My December, January, February three month streak where each new month averaged higher than the previous month ended in March.  March was still good but not better that February – even with 2 more days.  On the bright side, I learned a few things traffic-wise and I believe a summertime redesign is in order.

In closing, If there would be one word I’d like to tattoo to my arm for the remaining months, it would be – perseverance.  I have nine more months to go and I WILL have progress in the end.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

Leaders Understand that Time is Finite

Hola Todos!

Mr. Mike has an excellent thought for us today.  It’s not surprising to anyone reading this post that the laws of physics have not changed – we only have 24 hours in any given day.  Usually, we just put lots of hours in but never take a step back to examine how poorly we manage out time.  In summary, place those big rocks first (click here for full post) and increase your effectiveness.

Mike, the floor is yours….

To: The Great Leaders Who Have a Passion for Continuous Learning

William Penn, English entrepreneur and philosopher, wrote: “Time is what we want most, but what we use worst.”  One of the challenges that all great leaders face is the effective use of their time – those precious seconds, minutes and hours that relentlessly vanish from each day’s calendar.  In his article, “Time Doesn’t Scale,” (click here for full post) Seth Godin suggests a change in approach in the way of looking at time and how we use it to increase the great leader’s effectiveness.

Time doesn’t scale…But bravery does.

The challenge of work-life balance is a relatively new one, and it is an artifact of a world where you get paid for showing up, paid for hours spent, paid for working.  In that world, it’s clearly an advantage to have a team that spends more time than the competition. One way to get ahead as a freelancer or a factory worker of any kind (even a consultant at Deloitte) was simply to put in more hours. After all, that made you more productive, if we define productivity as output per dollar spent.

But people have discovered that after hour 24, there are no more hours left. Suddenly, you can’t get ahead by outworking the other guy, because both of you are already working as hard as Newtonian physics will permit. Just in time, the economy is now rewarding art and innovation and guts. It’s rewarding brilliant ideas executed with singular direction by aligned teams on behalf of truly motivated customers. None of which is measured on the clock.

John Cage [American composer] doesn’t work more hours than you. Neither does Carole Greider [molecular biologist]. Work/life balance is a silly question, just as work/food balance or work/breathing balance is.  It is not really up to you after a point.  Instead of sneaking around the edges, it might pay to cut your hours in half but take the intellectual risks and do the emotional labor you’re capable of.

Henry David Thoreau, American author and poet, writes:  “It’s not enough to be busy, so are the ants. The question is, what are we busy about?”  Be about your greatness… the incredible gifts within that are yet to be discovered, the ideas and innovations you will find by looking through different eyes, the dreams you will achieve because you have the courage and bravery to take risks and to be more than you ever dreamed you could be.

Have a beautiful day and a magnificent week!!!

Mike

 

Contact Information:

Michael M. Reuter

Director, Center for Leadership Development

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Tel: (Office) 973.275.2528

Email: Michael.Reuter@shu.edu