Facebook, Microsoft, Non-Verbal Communication and a Bunch of Other Stuff!

Hola Todos!

Now that we are past the Super Bowl, it’s time to get caught up with EVERYTHING… including DigNuggetville.  I’ve been stockpiling potential post for weeks now and with so many interesting articles, it would be March before I get to anything new.  So to unclog the logjam, here’s a meta-list of super nuggets!

Enjoy!

 

Happy Birthday Facebook – what did you get for your 10th birthday?

-A nice 10-year highlight video 

Five Key moments that changed Facebook

-CEO Mark Zuckerberg on the Today Show with a nice video of FB’s headquarters

 

Microsoft has a New Leader

-Microsoft has a new CEO – How Satya Nedella will change the company

-Satya Nedella: Signs of Leadership

 

Nonverbal Communications Nuggets

-5 Keys to Great Nonverbal Communication

-What if…. Details Determined Good Communication?

-7 Steps to Earn Others’ Trust without Saying a Word

-Does Body Language Shape Who You Are?

 

 

A Bunch of Other Stuff (to unlock this reference, watch this video)

-The Logic Behind 19 Common Interview Questions

-How to Network Purposefully

-Five Things Dale Carnegie Can Teach You about Social Selling

-Jeff Bezos: A Strong CEO

-How Daydreaming Can Actually Make You Smarter

-Content Marketing Challenges

-Content Marketing and ROI

-Steve Jobs would go for a walk to clear his head

-Apple’s New Retail Executive: Angela Ahrendts

What is SquareSpace with headquarters in New York City?

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

YES! Sheryl Sandberg Did a Billions Dollars Worth of Work!

Hola Todos!

News yesterday bouncing all around the blogosphere was that Sheryl Sandberg became a billionaire. Given the run Facebook’s stock has had over the past two quarters, it was only a matter of time.  Sheryl’s current shares and stock options, as well as, Facebook’s current stock price makes Sheryl is one of the youngest female billionaires and only one of seventeen in the world.

Unfortunately, Sheryl becoming a billionaire was not the most interesting aspect of this news. In the middle of a story posted in Bloomberg BusinessWeek, this quote ran:

“Did she do a billion dollars-worth of work? I don’t know,” David Kirkpatrick, author of “The Facebook Effect,” a history of the company, said in a telephone interview. “She had the good fortune to land in the right place where her talents could really be applauded.”

Now if that is not a thinly veiled shot, I don’t know what one is. Perhaps John Gruber of Daring Fireball but it best:

“Would Kirkpatrick have asked this of a man? And if he had would Bloomberg have run the quote?  I searched Google for the phrase ‘Did he do a billion dollars worth of work?’ and the only hit was this tweet from Jezebel editor-in-chief Jessica Coen, retweeting this tweet from Alex Leo pointing out the absurd gender bias in this article.”

Sheryl’s work is so cemented into the zeitgeist of Silicon Valley that often she is often used as a job title as in “I need to find myself a Sheryl Sandberg for my firm.” She earned the billion dollars, as Sheryl was vital in getting Facebook to where Facebook is today.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Social Media Promo vs. Super Bowl Promo: Who Wins?

Hola Todos!

At first glance, the results from this study is exactly what I’ve been preaching in my social media classes:  new media (e.g., the interactive, two-way social kind) is much better than traditional media (e.g., the one way, untrackable, I don’t know what I’m getting for my money kind).

As I have mentioned a few times before, I have an ROI mentality and I do not recommend for anyone to spend their marketing dollars when they do not know what they are getting for those expenditures.  Digital media is not perfect but it is a lot better than wasting half of my advertising dollars.

In a study of 500 small businesses by office supply giant Staples, 41 percent of the participants indicated they would take two million fans, almost double the number that would prefer a celebrity endorsement (22%) or a one-time Super Bowl ad (18%).

At second glance, the headline is much better than the overall results of the study.  Not only is 500 a relatively small sample size, it only includes small businesses (which goes undefined).  In addition, how much each of the survey participants spend on advertising is also unclear.  In summary, it makes a nice blog post but the results are not generalizable to larger firms nor other small businesses.

Something to think about today…

Best

Dr. Dan-o

More Than Just Clicks: Where is the Social ROI?

Hola Todos!

A friend forwarded me this link yesterday from TechCrunch highlighting comments from the TechCrunch Disrupt NY conference. At the event, senior advertising managers from Google, Facebook, and Twitter discussed/argued the value of digital advertising. Surprisingly, the panel spent more time discussing the value of a click than anything else.  Not surprisingly, the three firms stated that their brand advertisers are most concerned with the reach, frequency and results of their ad campaigns.

As my students will surely attest, I have an ROI mentality and discussing how much a “click” is worth is mostly uninteresting.  Of the three panelist, only Facebook mentioned  they have “been doing quite a bit of research in an attempt to tie online ads to offline purchases.”  In the article, Facebook said they are working with “Nielsen and DataLogix” which means they are really working with our friends at Catalina Marketing, which is the only firm that can link online behavior to offline purchases.

Something to read today…

Best

Dr. Dan-o

 

 

Chief Executive of the Week: Sheryl Sandberg

Hola Todos!

Without question, this has been Sheryl Sandberg’s week.  She started the week on 60 Minutes, NPR, then continued on to pretty much every major media outlet on the planet – and rightfully so.  Sheryl’s book – Lean In – addresses a very important topic in the workplace as men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in industry and government.  Her goal is to empower women and she offers a number of commonsense solutions in the book.  If anyone is going to make a difference on this issue, it will be Sheryl as she has the ear of many leaders.

Something to keep tabs on this year…

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

Twitter Mentioned in Half of the Super Bowl Ads

Hola Todos!

Being one of the biggest marketing/advertising events of the year, it is not surprising that the stories are still pouring out from Sunday’s big game.  One of the more interesting one’s details how Twitter was mentioned in nearly half of the Super Bowl ads while Facebook was mentioned in just four (down from eight last year).  For those keeping score at home, Instagram and YouTube were each mentioned once while Google+ when unmentioned.

Towards the end of his post, Matt McGee concluded:

“When it comes to second-screen advertising, it’s Twitter’s world now and there’s no close second place.”

I’m not sure I would agree here.  Twitter is all about immediacy and if the goal of the advertiser was to engage their audience now vs. later, then Twitter is the better platform.  I think much more data crunching is needed before we can claim that Twitter owns the second-screen.

What Matt and I will agree on is that Twitter is the better platform to capitalize on something quick – like the Blackout Bowl:

“They even took to Twitter for some quick and clever “blackout bowl” newjacking when the power went out in the Superdome during the third quarter. And, as Twitter’s advertising staff revealed, it only took four minutes for Twitter advertisers to start bidding on “power outage” as a search term.”

Something to think about today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Nugget Dictionary Keyword: “Your backroom is someone else’s front room”

Hola Todos!

Today’s nugget keyword is not a keyword but rather a phrase.  I was reading a blog post on AllthingsD the other day, and to no one’s surprise or dismay, Apple quietly announce that it is phasing out their social network Ping (click here for full article).  With Twitter and soon to be Facebook integration in full order, CEO Tim Cook stated this week, “We tried Ping, and I think the customer voted and said ‘This isn’t something that I want to put a lot of energy into.’ ”

This discussion and blog post on Ping got me thinking about phrase by the legendary Peter Drucker, “Your backroom is someone else’s front room” (click here).  One of Dr. Drucker’s fundamental beliefs is you should do only what you do best; play to your strengths.  In addition, managers should partner with other firms who can complement their strengths to minimize their weaknesses.

Dr. Drucker defined the “front room” as your strengths, or what the firm does best; the activity that which stirs your passion and shows off your excellence. Everything else is the firm’s backroom, and most definitely, some other firm does it better.  So the idea is to excel in your front room and find another firm to do your backroom.

In the Apple exemplar, we are all very familiar with Apple’s front room; iPod, iPhone, iPad, MacBook, etc., While Ping was in the front room, Apple was by no means excelling with Ping.  There were multiple other firms who did social networking better than Apple, and Apple is finally partnering with them.  I hope LinkedIn will be a partner in the near future too.

What surprises me most of this announcement is that every article that discusses either the Walter Isaacson book (click here) or the Adam Lashinsky book (click here) emphasizes that one of the main elements to Apple’s success is Apple’s ability to focus on just a few great things.  I guess even the mighty Apple looses focus every now and then and spends too much energy on something that someone else does much better.

Something to think about today…

Best regards

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Facebook Buys Instagram: More Details on the Deal

Hola Todos!

I was going though the articles on Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram as the news media gained more detail.  Here are some additional thoughts:

-It’s a cash and stock deal.  I was wondering why Facebook would part with that much cash even though the IPO will bring it back. Facebook needs cash right now as their model is not steller at generating cash and there are doing a lot of R & D experimenting right now. I bet the stock kicker was one of the tipping points for the Instagram founders to agree to this deal.  Facebook’s IPO will easily top Google’s record.

-Yes, this deal is all about mobile. Facebook also detailed that photos is one of main reasons users stay on Facebook longer than any other site.

-Finally it appears that Instagram’s founder and chief executive, 28-year-old Kevin Systrom, has a number of parallels that probably made this deal easier for Facebook to nab on the down low.  (1) Mr. Systrom was a former Google employee in product development and corporate and left to do other things.  No love for Google? Perhaps (2) Interning at a company that eventually became Twitter, Mr. Systrom met many of the leaders in tech including a young Mr. Zuckerberg, which Mr. Systrom considered joining Facebook but ultimately decided to stay in school.  With all the Facebook hype, you wonder if Mr. Systrom second-guessed that decision a few times.  (3) After his Google job, Mr. Systrom joined Nextstop Inc., a trip-recommendation site that Facebook later acquired for $2.5 million; another connection to Mark and Facebook.

Usually deals like the Facebook-Instagram one creates a knee-jerk reaction and starts a flurry of other deals by companies who what to “keep up with the neighbors.” The Wall Street Journal suggested Mr. Systrom would personally make $500 million from the cash-and-stock Facebook deal.  Who needs the lottery when you have a contact like Mark Zuckerberg, right?

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

Facebook Buys Instagram for 1 Billion

Hola Todos!

Yup – you read that headline correct – Instagram for $1 Billion; that’s billion with a B with a set of 12 zeros.  Click here for the CNNmoney article and click here for the All Things Digital article.

As we are all wondering  – why and….that much?  First the latter question – Facebook did this deal relatively quickly and very much on the down low.  The only way this happens is if Facebook paid a substantial premium.  Teams with much deeper pockets such as Google or even Apple could have easily created a bidding war so I have to tip my hat Mark and Sheryl for pulling this off.  It’s a major power play and it goes to show that Facebook is very serious about competing head-to-head with Google.

The former question – why – is much easier to explain.  While Facebook is already the king of web photos, Facebook is relatively weak on the mobile front and there is much improvement needed with Facebook in that arena.  I fully expect to see much effort, improvement and innovation by Facebook in the mobile space in the next 12 to 18 month.  Second, Instagram and its multitude of photo uploads is an excellent compliment to Facebook’s other major effort at the moment – Timeline.  Instagram make it that much  easier to get more information on one’s Timeline.

In closing, a billion bucks seems like a lot but Facebook will get all that cash back (if it is a cash deal) when they ring that IPO bell in 2012.  The best line from one of the two articles above: “Kodak goes bankrupt and Instagram is worth a billion dollars” – Wow.  Creative destruction (click here for full post) exemplified.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University