Learning From Failure: Wisdom From Michael Jordan

Hola Todos!

I was reading Peter Gruber on LinkedIn and he hit on one of my favorite themes – failing forward.  What really caught my eye was the quote from one of the most famous basketball players of all time – Michael Jordan:

“I have missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I have lost almost 300 games. On 26 occasions I have been entrusted to take the game’s winning shot, and I missed. I have failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”

We learn more from our failures than we do from our successes.  Now that is something to think about today!

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

Failing Forward – 10,000 Times

Hola Todos!

Learning from failure and failing forward is a familiar theme here on DigNuggetville.  Last night, while at the Science Fair for my kids, I saw an excellent quote from none other than professor innovation himself – Thomas Edison – on failing forward.

In various talks on the development process of the light bulb, Mr. Edison said:

 

“I have not failed 10,000 times. I have successfully found 10,000 ways that will not work.”

 

Something to think about today.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

 

WIIFM: What’s in it for me?

Hola Todos!

For those of you who have had the torture of being in one of my classes, no doubt you have heard me say on more than one occasion, that good marketers “Tell people what’s in it for them – because if there is nothing in it for them, they will not be interested in anything you’re selling.”

I was reading my Linkedin messages this morning and I saw an interesting post from Peter Guber – someone I follow within Linkedin because he wrote a rather interesting book on storytelling titled “Tell to Win: Connect, Persuade, and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story.”

I though the post was a nice fit with all my chatter this week on new year’s resolutions.  Titled “10 New Year’s Resolutions You Must Make For Your Greatest Business Success” the post features two items that caught my eye:

#2 – In gathering collaborators and support, focus on “what’s in it for them” – this will garner their attention and intention to respond to your call to action.

#9 – Embrace failure – if you’re not failing on occasion, you’re not taking enough chances testing the real quality of your talents and will unlikely achieve your greatest success.

Check out the full article when you get a chance.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Leadership: Remembering Zig Ziglar

Hola Todos!

Mr. Mike’s post this weekend to his Seton Hall University leadership community reminded me of my first job coming out of undergrad – a sales job for an advertising agency.  As a young (and very green) sales trainee, my boss was a big fan of Zig Ziglar and it just so happened that Zig was doing a presentation in Philly so I was lucky and got to go to the event – and the word event is an accurate description.

Prior to attending the event, I had no idea who Zig Ziglar was and all I knew was that I was going to get paid for a day’s work to attend this event without having to pay for the ticket a win-win.  I do recall vividly that the price of the ticket seemed astronomical compared to any rock concert I ever attended. Besides Zig, a number of prominent leaders (including General Norman Schwarzkopf who also passed on recently) presented as well.  In addition, I vividly recollect table after table of books, cassette recordings (remember, I was 23 at the time), and other Zig Ziglar swag for sale everywhere – and people were waiting in line with cash in hand to purchase his stuff.  I kept saying to myself, who is this guy?

Zig Ziglar was one of the first motivational speakers.  What I liked the most of Zig was that he had two careers.  He was a sales manager and sales trainer for a number of firms throughout his career but his speaking career came much later in life.  Zig published his first book in 1979 – at the age of 49.  Zig did not have Twitter, a blog, social networks (I bet he did have an old-school mail newsletter though) – he build his brand the old-fashion way which was always a central theme in his talks.  Success is hard work so roll up your sleeves and get cracking!

Zig was known for clever word play – many of his critics called it “corny” however but that’s OK.  Learning from failure has been a theme of a number of posts here on DigNuggetville and I think one of Zig’s best “Ziglarisms” was “Failure is a detour, not a dead-end street.”

Mr. Mike has a handful of additional “Ziglarisms” in his post below.  Mike, the floor is yours…

 

On November 28, 2012 the Los Angles Times headline read:  “Zig Ziglar dies at 86; motivational speaker inspired millions.” Ziglar was a great man and teacher, who changed the lives of millions through his books and public speaking.  At the beginning of this magnificent New Year let us pause a moment to reflect on Ziglar’s gifts to us.

 

“You were born to win, but to be a winner, you must plan to win, prepare to win, and expect to win.”

“Every choice you make has an end result.”

“Remember that failure is an event, not a person.”

“Your attitude, not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.”

“If you want to reach a goal, you must ‘see the reaching’ in your own mind before you actually arrive at your goal.”

“It’s not what you’ve got, it’s what you use that makes a difference.”

“You will get all you want in life if you help enough other people get what they want.”

“If you can dream it, then you can achieve it.”

 

May you fill your life with purpose, conviction and vision of what can be and who you will choose to become.  Live every moment of your precious life with passion, unbridled enthusiasm and joy.   Act to realize your dreams.  Look at the world through new eyes – to find the undiscovered and infinite possibilities it offers.  Serve others that they, too, may find their greatness.  Continue to learn, grow and stretch yourself… to be more than they ever dreamed you could be… and more… so much more. On your journey, remember Ziglar’s counsel to great leaders:  “If you can dream it, then you can achieve it.”  Life is so very beautiful.

Have a beautiful day, a fantastic week and a joyous, magnificent New Year!!!

Mike

 

Contact Information:

Michael M. Reuter

Director, Center for Leadership Development

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Tel: (Office) 973.275.2528

Email: Michael.Reuter@shu.edu

 

Leadership: Listen FIRST, Learn and then Lead

Hola Todos!

Since we are on a TED theme this week, today’s leadership nugget is from four-star General Stanley McChrystal, the former commander of U.S. and International forces in Afghanistan.  In his TED leadership video (click here), General McChrystal tells us that great leaders listen FIRST and then make decisions to lead their organizations.  How can you build a sense of shared purpose among people of many ages and skill sets? By listening and learning…

In addition to this message, General McChrystal reminds us of a similar theme here on DigNuggetville – failing forward.  Around the 7:18 minute mark, General McChrystal says, “Leaders can let you fail and yet not let you be a failure.”

Something to think about today…

Best

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

Leadership – “Experience is what we get, when we don’t get what we wanted”

Hola Todos!

Today’s leadership nugget comes from someone very inspirational to me – Professor Randy Pausch.  Dr. Pausch was a professor of computer science and human-computer interaction at Carnegie Mellon University when he learned he had pancreatic cancer. In August of 2007 after learning of his terminal diagnosis, he gave an inspirational lecture titled “The Last Lecture: Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams” (click here for video and click here and here for more background on Randy and his book). Professor Pausch died of complications from the pancreatic cancer in July 2008.

I was watching a DVD I have of Professor Pausch and he said something that made me stop the treadmill and rewind the DVD.  In an interview, Randy was asked, “Because our past is tied so intricately to our future, do you feel that one’s worth or even legacy includes all the regrets – brick walls succumbed to – or does it matter at all in the scheme of things in this universe or this life?”

Randy responded: “Absolutely, our legacy includes all the brick walls – the ones we got over and the ones we didn’t, right?  I didn’t get into the NFL and I talked about that in the lecture, as you know.  But again, at Electronic Arts, I learned this wonderful expression – experience is what we get, when we don’t get what we wanted – and of course part of our legacy is all the things we failed at because failure is where most of the learning occurs. So I like to tell my students, you know if you are failing a lot, you are probably learning more per time-unit then most of your peers, so don’t get discouraged.”

This quote echoes my teaching philosophy that “knowledge is constructed (e.g., experienced), not received” (click here & here for full post) and the idea of failing but failing forward (click here for full post).

Something to think about today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Leadership – Learning to Fail….Forward

Hola Todos!

Mr. Mike has a topic that is near and dear to my heart…FAILURE.  In one of my favorite leadership books Geeks & Greasers, by Warren Bennis with Robert Thomas, the authors talk about leaders and their crucible.  A crucible is an intense learning experience and for almost all of the leaders profiled in this book, their crucible was a horrible failure.  Just as Conan O’Brien discussed his crucible below, leaders learn from their (horrible) experiences.  They all failed, but they failed and then moved forward with their lives to do something better, of which, they would have never reached this better place without their failure.

There are hundreds of examples to illustrate but because this is my blog, I’ll use Steve Jobs; fired/ousted from the company he founded in 1985 because his weaknesses got the best of him. Created another company (NeXT) that was basically a failure too.  This 10 to 12 year crucible served Apple well as well as the consumers who purchased Apple’s products.  The Steve Jobs we know today would not have same story we know well without his colossal failures.

Mike, the floor is yours…

 

 

 

To:  The Great Leaders Who Have a Passion for Continuous Learning

 

In his June 2011 Commencement Address at Dartmouth University (click here), Conan O’Brien, TV host and writer, with an introduction filled with fun and humor, shared a lesson that he had learned the year before when he experienced “a very profound and public disappointment.”

He had failed.  He said: “I did not get what I wanted, and I left a system that had nurtured and helped define me for the better part of 17 years. I went from being in the center of the grid to not only off the grid….” He spent the next year wandering, doing things that were “silly, unconventional, spontaneous and seemingly irrational.”  His commitment to his purpose in life was being redefined and he felt liberated.  From this he realized:  “There are few things more liberating in this life than having your worst fear realized.”

He spoke of Johnny Carson who wanted to be a Jack Benny, famous 1940’s and 1950’s comedian, and failed; of David Letterman who wanted to be a Johnny Carson, and failed; and of comedians of his own generation who wanted to be David Letterman, and who failed.  Of this he said: “It is our failure to become our perceived ideal that ultimately defines us and makes us unique. It’s not easy, but if you accept your misfortune and handle it right, your perceived failure can become a catalyst for profound re-invention….The beauty is that through disappointment you can gain clarity, and with clarity comes conviction and true originality.”

What magnificent rewards that disappointment offers: the clarity to see one’s purpose more clearly, the conviction to have a greater commitment to accomplish it and the gaining a greater realization and understand of our own beautify uniqueness.  Eliza Tabor, author, writes: “Disappointment to a noble soul is what cold water is to burning metal; it strengthens, tempers, intensifies, but never destroys it.”  May your disappointments be few, but when they come, may you treasure the beautiful gifts they give and become greater with their departure.

Have a beautiful day and a fantastic week!!!

 

Mike

 

Contact Information:

Michael M. Reuter

Director, Center for Leadership Development

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Tel: (Office) 973.275.2528

Email: Michael.Reuter@shu.edu