Welcome Back DigNuggetville: 2014 Edition

Hola Todos!

I hope the New Year has been treating everyone well and I hope we are sticking to our 2014 New Year resolutions.

Before I begin, I believe I owe the people of DigNuggetville an apology – or at the very least – an explanation; this is the LONGEST gap between posts in the two and a half-year history of DigNuggetville.  One of my mantras (as posted multiple times) is Big Rocks First – a philosophy to prioritize the many things I juggle day in and day out.  This philosophy forces me to think ahead and plan longer-term.

In November and December, I had rocks that were bigger than the blog (most noticeably – my tenure review and working with the 2014 NY/NJ Superbowl Host Committee).  Moreover, I was totally spent at the end of the Fall semester and took time during the semester break to really rest up; I shut everything down to enjoy the time with the family.

2014 and the Spring semester is here and as usual, there are many exciting things to tackle.  There is still much work to be done on the tenure front – the Social Media Communications Center will be in full swing starting Monday January 20th – and I have some interesting classes (Principles & Social Media – undergrad; Sales Management – MBA) this Spring semester.

I look forward to an exciting 2014!

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

Leadership: The Summer BIG Rock Goals

Hola Todos!

Well, the calendar tells us its summer time and we all know that come Labor Day, summer time comes to an end.  Mr. Mike’s post below reminds us to plan ahead and plan forward.  In my eyes, they only way we can accomplish this is by placing our Big Rocks First (click here for full post).  We should make a significant effort to plan for those two or three seminal events (vacation anyone?) of the summer and then fit all the other activities around those big rocks.

Mr. Mike, the floor is yours…

 

To:  The Great Leaders Who Have a Passion for Continuous Learning

With the beginning of summer for those of us in the northern hemisphere Philip Humbert ‘s article, “Make It One Heck of a Summer”, and its message of carpe diem again comes to mind.  I share this at the beginning of each summer as its point continues to serve us well as a moment of reflection of something great to come.  In the article he talks about how he and his wife in October seemed to always have the same conversation about summer:  “Oh, no!  Where did the summer go?”  Moments later the house was filled with whining and moaning, a few complaints and exclamations that, “I can’t believe we let it get away again!”  I believe his experience is similar to most of ours and that come October, we may look back with similar regrets.

His point is to remind us that we are in control.  Our summer and how we will spend it is our hands. It is about goal setting.  Human beings, he says, are by nature “goal-setting and goal-achieving creatures.”  We set goals everyday – from the planning of our daily schedule to planning what we will eat during the week.  So, if we are to have the greatest summer of our lives, we need to plan to make it the greatest.  Start today.  Circle dates on the calendar and mark them with things you want and love to do.  Fill it up and let it overflow the brim.  Live this summer as the greatest you have ever had!   It is your beautiful and special life to live to its fullest.  Stretch yourself to do new things, uncover new possibilities and happiness – for you, your family and those around you.  And in October, look back proudly with satisfaction at what you have achieved, learned and experienced.  Happiness and success is in your choosing and doing.  Choose wisely and choose well!

Have a beautiful day, a fantastic week and a joyous and magnificent summer!!!

Mike

Contact Information:

 

Michael M. Reuter

Director, Center for Leadership Development

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Tel: (Office) 973.275.2528

Email: Michael.Reuter@shu.edu

 

 

Leaders Understand that Time is Finite

Hola Todos!

Mr. Mike has an excellent thought for us today.  It’s not surprising to anyone reading this post that the laws of physics have not changed – we only have 24 hours in any given day.  Usually, we just put lots of hours in but never take a step back to examine how poorly we manage out time.  In summary, place those big rocks first (click here for full post) and increase your effectiveness.

Mike, the floor is yours….

To: The Great Leaders Who Have a Passion for Continuous Learning

William Penn, English entrepreneur and philosopher, wrote: “Time is what we want most, but what we use worst.”  One of the challenges that all great leaders face is the effective use of their time – those precious seconds, minutes and hours that relentlessly vanish from each day’s calendar.  In his article, “Time Doesn’t Scale,” (click here for full post) Seth Godin suggests a change in approach in the way of looking at time and how we use it to increase the great leader’s effectiveness.

Time doesn’t scale…But bravery does.

The challenge of work-life balance is a relatively new one, and it is an artifact of a world where you get paid for showing up, paid for hours spent, paid for working.  In that world, it’s clearly an advantage to have a team that spends more time than the competition. One way to get ahead as a freelancer or a factory worker of any kind (even a consultant at Deloitte) was simply to put in more hours. After all, that made you more productive, if we define productivity as output per dollar spent.

But people have discovered that after hour 24, there are no more hours left. Suddenly, you can’t get ahead by outworking the other guy, because both of you are already working as hard as Newtonian physics will permit. Just in time, the economy is now rewarding art and innovation and guts. It’s rewarding brilliant ideas executed with singular direction by aligned teams on behalf of truly motivated customers. None of which is measured on the clock.

John Cage [American composer] doesn’t work more hours than you. Neither does Carole Greider [molecular biologist]. Work/life balance is a silly question, just as work/food balance or work/breathing balance is.  It is not really up to you after a point.  Instead of sneaking around the edges, it might pay to cut your hours in half but take the intellectual risks and do the emotional labor you’re capable of.

Henry David Thoreau, American author and poet, writes:  “It’s not enough to be busy, so are the ants. The question is, what are we busy about?”  Be about your greatness… the incredible gifts within that are yet to be discovered, the ideas and innovations you will find by looking through different eyes, the dreams you will achieve because you have the courage and bravery to take risks and to be more than you ever dreamed you could be.

Have a beautiful day and a magnificent week!!!

Mike

 

Contact Information:

Michael M. Reuter

Director, Center for Leadership Development

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Tel: (Office) 973.275.2528

Email: Michael.Reuter@shu.edu

 

Leadership Wednesday – Leaders Evolve because They Put Their Big Rocks First

Hola Todos!

Mr. Mike is back with us for the New Year and he’s right on theme for the week.  First, Mike reminds us that we as leaders cannot stand still.  We must evolve, reinvent ourselves, think differently, creatively destruct the status quo, and not just think outside the box but also BREAK the box (at times).  In the 2nd half of his post, Mike also likes the “Big Rocks” first theme and I learned that it was Stephen Covey who I should be referencing for this allegory.

Mr. Mike, the floor is yours…

 

To:  The Great Leaders Who Have a Passion for Continuous Learning

As the New Year begins, we take stock of this past year’s accomplishments and learnings, and we begin planning for the great and exciting New Year to come.  In a recent note Philip Humbert, leadership guru and coach, speaks about preparing for our 2012 journey.  He tells us two truths:

“Here’s a great truth: You are evolving. You are, inevitably, becoming something and someone new all the time. You are not the same person you were a year ago! You know stuff you didn’t know back then. You have skills you didn’t have a year ago. You’ve forgotten or ignored or gotten confused about things that used to be terrifically important! Over time, we evolve.  And, here’s a second truth: It either happens by accident, or it happens on purpose, according to a plan.

His wonderfully simple advice for each of us is:  “Evolve on purpose.”  The choice of the paths that we will follow during this coming year is in our hands.  We must choose wisely and well.

A great beginning for our 2012 planning comes from Stephen Covey’s lesson of “The Big Rocks” of life from his book First Things First.  It provides fertile ground for our planning and the seeds of greatness we will sow.

“As this man stood in front of the group of high-powered over-achievers he said, “Okay, time for a quiz.” Then he pulled out a one-gallon, wide-mouthed mason jar and set it on a table in front of him. Then he produced about a dozen fist-sized rocks and carefully placed them, one at a time, into the jar.  When the jar was filled to the top and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, “Is this jar full?” Everyone in the class said, “Yes.” Then he said, “Really?” He reached under the table and pulled out a bucket of gravel. Then he dumped some gravel in and shook the jar causing pieces of gravel to work themselves down into the spaces between the big rocks.

“Then he smiled and asked the group once more, “Is the jar full?” By this time the class was onto him. “Probably not,” one of them answered. “Good!” he replied. And he reached under the table and brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in and it went into all the spaces left between the rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the question, “Is this jar full?”

“No!” the class shouted. Once again he said, “Good!” Then he grabbed a pitcher of water and began to pour it in until the jar was filled to the brim. Then he looked up at the class and asked, “What is the point of this illustration?”  One eager beaver raised his hand and said, “The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard, you can always fit some more things into it!”  “No,” the speaker replied, “that’s not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is: If you don’t put the big rocks in first, you’ll never get them in at all.”

As you begin this year’s journey, ask yourself:  What are the big rocks in my life? What principal goals will I accomplish?  What will be their impact on my business, my family and my community?  Focus on those critical few that will bring the greatest value to your life, your business and those whom you serve.  In January 2013, these ‘big rocks’, when accomplished through your passion and commitment, will become the new cornerstones for that new year’s growth.

May this New Year be your greatest ever for you and yours: one filled with incredible personal and professional growth… for yourself and others;, a year filled with passion, joy and love; a year again filled with magnificent accomplishments; a year in which you become more than you ever dreamed you could be.  Enjoy each precious moment of your magnificent journey this year… and have fun doing it.

Happy New Year! May it be the best ever.

Have a beautiful day and a great week!!!

Mike

Contact Information:

Michael M. Reuter

Director, Center for Leadership Development

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Tel: (Office) 973.275.2528

Email: Michael.Reuter@shu.edu

 

 

 

 

An Easy Lesson on “How to Fail”

Hola Todos!

Benjamin Franklin was a lot of things: Businessman, Philosopher, Statesman, Diplomat, Scientist, Entrepreneur and Printer.  One of his many famous quotes was, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”

If you have big goals and big dreams, plan forward and drop those “big rocks first.” (see link here).

Best regards

Dr. Dan-o