The Wild, Wild West of Mobile Advertising

Hola Todos!

To be 100% direct, the nascent but developing mobile advertising market is what I call the wild, wild west – meaning there are no rules or established practices commonplace in more well developed areas of advertising.  The following article “The Incredible Shrinking Ad” from The Atlantic is solid and examines this topic in the tradition of 1,000+ word journalism that is becoming more rare these days.

Enjoy!

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

Twitter Mentioned in Half of the Super Bowl Ads

Hola Todos!

Being one of the biggest marketing/advertising events of the year, it is not surprising that the stories are still pouring out from Sunday’s big game.  One of the more interesting one’s details how Twitter was mentioned in nearly half of the Super Bowl ads while Facebook was mentioned in just four (down from eight last year).  For those keeping score at home, Instagram and YouTube were each mentioned once while Google+ when unmentioned.

Towards the end of his post, Matt McGee concluded:

“When it comes to second-screen advertising, it’s Twitter’s world now and there’s no close second place.”

I’m not sure I would agree here.  Twitter is all about immediacy and if the goal of the advertiser was to engage their audience now vs. later, then Twitter is the better platform.  I think much more data crunching is needed before we can claim that Twitter owns the second-screen.

What Matt and I will agree on is that Twitter is the better platform to capitalize on something quick – like the Blackout Bowl:

“They even took to Twitter for some quick and clever “blackout bowl” newjacking when the power went out in the Superdome during the third quarter. And, as Twitter’s advertising staff revealed, it only took four minutes for Twitter advertisers to start bidding on “power outage” as a search term.”

Something to think about today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

The Super Bowl – The Black Out Bowl – USA Today Ad Meter was OFF…

Hola Todos!

The Super Bowl is always the biggest advertising night of the year where we usually see some of the most creative work in the field.  Interestingly, some of the most creative work happened during the blackout – now dubbed “The Blackout Bowl.”  Twitter absolute lit up 4 to 5 minutes in to the blackout and smart marketers such as Tide and Oreo took advantage and got way more bang for their buck than some of those sloppy $3.8 million 30 second ads.

Historically, The USAtoday Ad Meter has been on the ball when it comes to rating and ranking the best ads.  This year, however, I do not think they batted .500.   My top 5 in order were Audi – Taco Bell “viva young” – Tide – Oreo – M&M’s.  I liked many others including the Jeep and the Doritos spots and I’d but the Clydesdales in the top 10 (perhaps in the top 5) but the RAM, Kia, Deion Sanders/NFL draft or Hyundai ads did not belong in the top 10.  Taco Bell’s “viva young” – Best Buy’s Amy Poehler – and Oreo were down way too low.  Even the Mercedes Benz – “Simpathy with the Devil” spot should have been much higher.  At least they got the prenally bad Go Daddy ads correct – towards the bottom third of the list.

Check out the links when you get a chance.

 

best

Dr. Dan-o

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

Why Waste Your $3.8 Million on a 30 Second Super Bowl Ad?

Hola Todos!

I have an ROI mentality when it comes to spending marketing dollars.  The idea of spending $3.8 million dollars on a TV ad, when it will be very difficult to determine what I will get in return for the money – – strikes me funny.  If I can’t track it, perhaps it is not worth the investment?  At the very least, we should consider a few alternatives.

What I like about the this Super Bowl article is it at least entertains the idea that one could get a lot more bang for the buck, as well as, trackable return by spending your $3.8 million via other means such as at least 8 days of homepage ad units on YouTube for up to $500,000 a day.
 For businesses that do not sell directly to the end user, perhaps the digital route is not all that much better but for any business that can directly convert online, I’d recommend spending your marketing dollars where they are easier to track.

Something to think about today.

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

 

Social and TV: Coming of Age

Hola Todos!

I have been blurting about social TV in class for some time now but to my surprise, there has been few solid articles addressing the topic.  Thankfully, Mike Mikho of Big Fuel in NYC did a nice thought piece in Advertising Age that provides a number of nuggets such as: “Consider social as an amplification tool for a TV-heavy marketing plan and plug it into a media-mix model” and “Broadcast marketers are starting to create engaging, sharable content to leverage the long-term benefits of social, and social marketers are working more closely with broadcast teams to amplify reach and drive calls to action.

Something interesting to check out today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

Social Media Metrics Roundup

Hola Todos!

My passion for the Web 2.0/Social Media world is driven by an ROI mentality.  With regards traditional marketing (e.g., mass marketing), I feel the famous quote by John Wanamaker says it best:  “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.” Its not that social media metrics are perfect – far from it – but in my eyes, these new web are much better that anything we have ever had or did before.

The first of the three articles featured today is from Adweek (click here) and it opens with that famous Wanamaker quote.  In addition, the article details how old-school sex and age targeting will be rendered obsolete by better metrics.

The last two articles list a number of metrics tools – most of which I had never heard of and need to start exploring.  The first is from Amex’s OpenForum and discusses the 10 smartest web analytics tools (click here).  The second is from Social Media Examinier and explores 5 metrics tools specifically for Twitter (click here).

Something to check out today…

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Twitter’s Business Model?

Hola Todos!

Beyond Yahoo and the “What is Yahoo?” question, the other “billion” dollar question frequently discussed in the business press is “What is Twitter’s business model?” To be honest, a simple answer to that question does not exist.

A new flurry of articles sprang up after Twitter announced in late June that Twitter will soon have “stricter guidelines” around how much latitude independent developers will have to build applications on top of Twitter (e.g., its API). At the same time, LinkedIn announced it no longer had permission to include Twitter streams inside of the social network (click here for more detail from Reuters).

In sum, it appears Twitter is on the move to towards an “advertising” dominant model as they clamp-down on how and where Twitter’s content – the stream of Tweets – is viewed by users (e.g., controlling the where the eyeballs see Tweets).  Twitter’s 140 million monthly active users collectively publish 400 million Tweets daily and CEO Dick Costolo believes Twitter will have a $1 billon dollar ad business by 2014.

Recently, I listened to John Gruber’s “The Talk Show” podcast (from approximately the 28:00 to the 1:03:00 min mark – click here) with guest Dan Frommer and they dumped a healthy hump of skepticism on this strategy (click here for Dan Frommer’s detailed commentary on his blog SplatF).

While Twitter is just 6 years young, the pressure is on for Twitter to develop a sustainable business model.  For the past 18 to 24 months, the leaders at Twitter still have not convinced any of their constituents (e.g., the business press, advertisers, geek professors like myself, etc) that they have a business model that is both scalable and sustainable.  I expect to see more announcements/refinements from Twitter by year’s end.

Something to think about today…

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

Nike is in the Vanguard – AGAIN – This Time with Digital & Interactive Advertising

Hola Todos!

I knew this would happen someday (I always thought the feature article would be about Proctor & Gamble but Nike is an excellent exemplar too).  I’ll let the quotes speak for themselves (click here for full article):

 

“Nike’s spending on TV and print advertising in the U.S. has dropped by 40% in just three years, even as its total marketing budget has steadily climbed upward to hit a record $2.4 billion last year.”

“Clearly they think they can get by without big television campaigns anymore.”

“That’s a major change, Nike CEO Mark Parker explained to Fortune. “Connecting used to be, ‘Here’s some product, and here’s some advertising. We hope you like it,’ ” he says. “Connecting today is a dialogue.”

“(Nike) spent nearly $800 million on ‘nontraditional’ advertising in 2010, according to Advertising Age estimates, a greater percentage of its U.S. advertising budget than any other top 100 U.S. advertiser. (And Nike’s latest filings indicate that that figure will grow in 2011.)”

“(Nike) has overhauled its $100 million-plus campaigns around major events like the World Cup and Olympics to focus on online campaigns first. The result? Before, the biggest audience Nike had on any given day was when 200 million tuned in to the Super Bowl.  Now, across all its sites and social media communities, it can hit that figure any day.”

 

I have been singing this song for the past 3 to 4 years now: the decline of traditional shotgun mass-marketing national TV advertising and the rise of interactive, two-way, trackable and ROI calculating advertising – all at the same time being significantly micro-targeting to smaller and more specific customers.  Well done marketing team at Nike, well done.

I have a feeling that 12 months from now, Nike will not be the only company in the top 100 advertisers list that spends more on interactive & two-way advertising than traditional mass marketing TV ads.

 

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Apps, Pinterest, Human as Brand, Apple CLV & Potpourri

Hola Todos!

I had a crazy/nutty/busy last week so I did not get a chance to read much – or as least read as much as I usually do.  Moreover, classes are in full swing so we a plethora of different conversation threads active among us.  I love to add fuel to the fire so here are some excellent new stories from the last week:

How to Create a $1M App with a $10K Marketing Budget

Super Bowl Advertising – Social TV Experience (e.g., Shazam, GetGlue, etc) in the Forefront

Google Knows Too Much About You

Human as Brand/Fan Identity w/The Phantom Menace

Human as Brand/Fan Identity w/Kathy Ireland

Pinterest – Why Image-Sharing Network Pinterest Is Hot

Pinterest – The Appending Affiliate Links to Some Pins

How Pinterest is Becoming the Next Big Thing in Social Media for Business

12 Most Effective Ways to Engage on Twitter

Apple, Customer Lifetime Value & Customer Churn

Enjoy!

Dr. Dan-0

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 


Super Bowl Ads – At $166,667 a Second

Hola Todos!

I hope you all enjoyed the game.  Congratulations goes out to Giants and Eli fans and sympathy to the Patriots and Tom fans.  (Us Eagles fans know how you feel Boston fans).  However, congratulations should also go out to NBC/Comcast for selling out (early) all 54 of those $3.5 million dollar ads we just saw on the Super Bowl; that’s $189 million bucks – Wow (and that was just during the game)!

I’m sure we all had our favorites.  The USA Today favored the dogs (e.g., Doritos, VW, and Bud Light’s Weego – click here) while The Wall Street Journal favored the cars (e.g., Acura, Chrysler, VW – a triple whammy with dogs, cars AND Star Wars, as well as, Honda/Ferris Bueller – click here).

Personally, I thought top honors should go to the $5.84 million Chrysler/Clint Eastwood spot and CNNMoney.com agreed (click here).

While I enjoyed many of the ads last night, the one I feel that will stick with me for a few days, the one that made me think, the one that made me feel – was the Chrysler halftime spot. The ad was created by one of the top ad agencies of my generation – Weiden + Kennedy.  Weiden + Kennedy is famously Nike’s long-time advertising firm and they also made the Coke polar bear spots last night which also fared well.

In my eyes, a successful advertisement has to convey a story to get the brand message to imprint in viewers’ brains.  A tip of the hat goes to the Weiden + Kennedy for telling the best story of night and I bet that story will last longer in water cooler discussionland than another other story we saw last night.

Best regards

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, PhD

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University