What Should the Mentee Be DOING in the Mentor-Mentee Relationship?

Hola Todos!

I search for nuggets high and low but this one is a gem.  Most articles examining mentor-mentee relationships tell the story from the mentor’s perspective. It is rare to find a nuggetworthy conversation concerning what the mentee should bring to the relationship.

The other day, I was listening to the Harvard Business Review podcast “Managing Up and Across With Your Mentor.”  Finally, someone was having a meaty conversation about what the mentee should be doing in the relationship. For instance:

Well, one of the first things we have to deal with on the topic of mentors is it’s not just one mentor. And the individuals that are most successful in tapping mentors, or in a sense, creating their own personal board of directors. So they’re very deliberately saying what are the skills gaps that I have?” [Meaning.. who can I find to fill those skill gaps?]

So I am advocating a bit [to] start lurking your boss and your boss’s network. And it’s actually a good thing. It’s how you’re going to learn what’s important to your boss. Now that you know what your boss is interested in, you can be much more proactive in sharing content, articles, conferences, whatever that will help your boss reach their individual business goals.”

So I think if you almost develop a strategic plan of what your boss is trying to accomplish. And then how can you be deliberate in making yourself the go-to person to meet your boss’s objective? And so that’s key.”

This podcast is well worth the 12 minutes and is something to share with your friends (or mentees) today!

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

 

 

Twitter Mentioned in Half of the Super Bowl Ads

Hola Todos!

Being one of the biggest marketing/advertising events of the year, it is not surprising that the stories are still pouring out from Sunday’s big game.  One of the more interesting one’s details how Twitter was mentioned in nearly half of the Super Bowl ads while Facebook was mentioned in just four (down from eight last year).  For those keeping score at home, Instagram and YouTube were each mentioned once while Google+ when unmentioned.

Towards the end of his post, Matt McGee concluded:

“When it comes to second-screen advertising, it’s Twitter’s world now and there’s no close second place.”

I’m not sure I would agree here.  Twitter is all about immediacy and if the goal of the advertiser was to engage their audience now vs. later, then Twitter is the better platform.  I think much more data crunching is needed before we can claim that Twitter owns the second-screen.

What Matt and I will agree on is that Twitter is the better platform to capitalize on something quick – like the Blackout Bowl:

“They even took to Twitter for some quick and clever “blackout bowl” newjacking when the power went out in the Superdome during the third quarter. And, as Twitter’s advertising staff revealed, it only took four minutes for Twitter advertisers to start bidding on “power outage” as a search term.”

Something to think about today…

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

 

 

The Power of Curiosity: Part II

Hola Todos!

A few post back, I started a thread on the power of curiosity and I am happy to say Mr. Mike’s recent leadership post added more fuel to this fire.

I just love #3 below: “Make why your favorite word”  – I’m not sure I could say it better myself.

Mr. Mike, the floor is yours…

 

 

To:  The Great leaders Who Have a Passion for Continuous Learning

In his book, “The 15 Invaluable Laws of Growth,” John Maxwell shares his Law of Curiosity.  He writes: “Curious people possess a thirst for knowledge. They are interested in life, people, ideas, experiences, and events, and they live in a constant state of wanting to learn more. They continually ask why?” This is a gift that great leaders nurture and grow.  It add luster and shine to their creativity, enabling them to imagine the unimaginable. He provides ten suggestions for developing a strong sense of curiosity.

1.       Believe you can be curious –  “You cannot be what you believe you aren’t.”

2.       Have a beginner’s mind-set –  “…wondering why and asking a lot of questions.”

3.       Make why your favorite word – “Never forget, anyone who knows all the answers in not asking the right questions.”

4.       Spend time with other curious people – “…seek out other curious people” – they serve as stimulants to you.

5.       Learn something new every day –  “Begin each day with a determination to learn something new, experience something different, or meet someone you don’t already know.”

6.       Partake in the fruit of failure – “People who grow and develop see failure as a sign of progress.”

7.       Stop looking for the right answer – “Single solution people are not putting themselves in the best situation to learn and grow.  Why? Because this is always more than one solution to a problem.”

8.       Get over yourself – Don’t be afraid of looking foolish. “If we never tried anything that might make us look ridiculous, we’d still be in caves.” Roger van Oech, author

9.       Get out of the box – Have an abundance mindset – “There ain’t no rules around here! We’re trying to accomplish something!” Thomas Edison, inventor

10.   Enjoy your life – ‘The race will go to the curious, the slightly mad, and those with an unsatiated passion for learning and daredeviltry.” Tom Peters, In Search of Excellence

Walt Disney said: “Around here, however, we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we’re curious… and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” This is the insatiable excitement and joy of life and the lives of great leaders – to find new opportunities, to see behind the mountain, imagine the unimaginable. Never stop asking why, for the answer to your question may be what could be.  Remember the words of Plutarch, Greek historian and writer: “The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.” Let your fire burn brightly and change the world. Life is so very good.

Have a beautiful day and a magnificent week!!!

Mike

 

Contact Information:

Michael M. Reuter

Director, Center for Leadership Development

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University

Email: Michael.Reuter@shu.edu

 

 

The Super Bowl – The Black Out Bowl – USA Today Ad Meter was OFF…

Hola Todos!

The Super Bowl is always the biggest advertising night of the year where we usually see some of the most creative work in the field.  Interestingly, some of the most creative work happened during the blackout – now dubbed “The Blackout Bowl.”  Twitter absolute lit up 4 to 5 minutes in to the blackout and smart marketers such as Tide and Oreo took advantage and got way more bang for their buck than some of those sloppy $3.8 million 30 second ads.

Historically, The USAtoday Ad Meter has been on the ball when it comes to rating and ranking the best ads.  This year, however, I do not think they batted .500.   My top 5 in order were Audi – Taco Bell “viva young” – Tide – Oreo – M&M’s.  I liked many others including the Jeep and the Doritos spots and I’d but the Clydesdales in the top 10 (perhaps in the top 5) but the RAM, Kia, Deion Sanders/NFL draft or Hyundai ads did not belong in the top 10.  Taco Bell’s “viva young” – Best Buy’s Amy Poehler – and Oreo were down way too low.  Even the Mercedes Benz – “Simpathy with the Devil” spot should have been much higher.  At least they got the prenally bad Go Daddy ads correct – towards the bottom third of the list.

Check out the links when you get a chance.

 

best

Dr. Dan-o

Best regards,

Dr. Dan-o

 

Daniel M. Ladik, Ph.D.,

 

Associate Professor of Marketing

Stillman School of Business

Seton Hall University